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Voting Presidential Election Disabled Community

Voter Turnout Among People with Disabilities Expected to Surge

When politicians are planning their outreach to various demographics ahead of the 2020 presidential race, they don’t often talk about people with disabilities.

New data shows that politicians who ignore disabled Americans may be missing out on a growing group of voters whose support could be up for grabs in 2020 — and activists are hoping to take advantage of this momentum.

Voter turnout among people with disabilities surged by 8.5 percentage points in 2018, representing a larger increase and more voters than in any of the previous two midterm elections.

The key takeaway from all of this, is that the voices in the disability community are important and they need to be heard…and they ARE being heard. Keep pushes for change because it is your right.

Disability and Voter Turnout in the 2018 Elections Key Points*Voting Presidential Election Disabled Community

  • Voter turnout surged by 8.5 points in 2018 among citizens with disabilities relative to the 2014 midterm elections. The surge, though, was slightly larger among citizens without disabilities (11.9 points), resulting in a 4.7 point gap in voter turnout between citizens with and without disabilities in 2018.
  • The increased turnout among people with disabilities occurred across all disability types and demographic categories—gender, race/ethnicity, age group, and region.
  • 3 million citizens with disabilities reported voting in the November 2018 elections.
  • Employed people with disabilities were just as likely as employed people without disabilities to vote, suggesting that employment helps bring people with disabilities into mainstream political life.
  • If people with disabilities voted at the same rate as people without disabilities who have the same demographic characteristics, there would be about 2.35 million more voters.

 

*Key points above are according to a report released by researchers at Rutgers University. These figures are based on analysis of data from the federal government’s Current Population Survey Voting Supplement for November 2018, which has a sample size of 88,749. The computations were made using six disability questions introduced on the Current Population Survey in 2008.