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Every Moment Matters

Shared values are what brings people together. They let people know what’s right, what’s wrong, and what outcomes people should prioritize over others. Shared values keep people moving toward the same goal.

At United Access, we believe in living our values each and every day. Leadership. Teamwork. Integrity. Passion. Respect. These are the values that reflect who we are and what we stand for as a company. Our culture is centered around doing what is right. United Access employees live these values day after day through interactions with customers, vendors, community partners and each other.

While we can talk about how committed we are to our customers and our community, those words mean more coming from our customers themselves.

6 months ago, when it became clear I needed a wheelchair accessible van, I researched options and contacted Rick Camp at United Access who was friendly and never used pressure sales tactics. When we decided which van we wanted from their nationwide inventory, Rick delivered the van to our home nearly an hour from the dealership. I was accidentally overcharged and would never have known but United Access refunded the money as soon as they realized the errors. Our van has been problem free and has made the lives of my wife and I much easier. I appreciate Rick for making the van purchase easy and the dealership for their honesty.

Hollis – Sandy, UT

They helped my wife reclaim her freedom

Kevin K. – Chandler, AZ

Thank you for locating the problem causing my FOB not to operate my ramp from outside the vehicle. Your perseverance paid off and I can use my vehicle without the fear of not being able to get back inside with the FOB only. And thank you for checking the engine light which had nothing to do with why I was there but it gave me peace of mind until I could get to an auto mechanic. Thank you guys so much! I appreciate you more than words can express.

Sharon A. – Carrollton, TX

At United Access, we believe there’s no better job than coming to work knowing you’re able to impact someone’s life for the better. That’s what it’s all about and that’s why we believe that every moment with every customer matters.

How to Get Ready for Moving a Loved One into Your Home

Many adults experience a role reversal when aging parents need to move in with them. Whether for health or financial reasons, many seniors can no longer live alone later in life. At the same time, most seniors prefer not to move into assisted living or senior care facilities. One relatively inexpensive solution is inviting them to live with you. Providing care, companionship, and security can make a world of difference for your loved one.

Let Them Make Decisions

Many older adults are resistant to moving out of their homes. Especially if they’re living in the family home, aging in place is preferable for three out of four seniors, AARP notes. Unfortunately, there may be signs that it’s time for some assistance with daily living. In addition to needing help with eating, bathing, and getting out of bed, older adults may experience isolation or poor health when living alone.

At the same time, giving your loved one control over the decision making can help them feel better about the move. Work together to establish a timeline for decluttering, packing, and moving—and talk through it to help manage emotions. Being sensitive to your loved one’s needs is essential in this transition.

Decide What to Do with Their Home

If a senior family member is coming to live with you, deciding what to do with their current home is a major decision. While you shouldn’t make any demands on your parent or relative, the best choice for everyone might be to sell the home.

Overseeing a rental or managing upkeep of the place can be time-consuming and even expensive, though the rental income could be a financial benefit. But depending on the costs involved in upkeep—plus any remaining mortgage balance—it might be better to sell. Then, your loved one may have funds to put toward savings, medical expenses, or other needs.

Think About Storage

If your loved one is downsizing from their own home and moving into yours, you may need some storage solutions. Moving can be stressful and life-changing, so giving up prized possessions isn’t ideal. Do what you can to accommodate your loved one—even if that involves adding more storage to your home.

Instead of renting a storage unit far from your home, think about adding a steel building to your property. This way, your loved one won’t have to part with special items—big or small—and has immediate access to them if necessary. A steel building, especially, offers high durability and cost-effectiveness in comparison with monthly rental at a storage facility.

Plan for AccessibilityUnited Access Wheelchair Lifts for Sale

If your loved one has mobility or health challenges, you may need to modify your home for accessibility. Steps like installing lifts for stairs, building ramps for wheelchair access, installing handrails, and converting rooms can add up—costing you thousands of dollars.

Depending on your family member’s needs—and your existing home—it might even make more sense to purchase a new house. Think carefully about your family’s safety and comfort, then see if it’s worth looking at properties currently on the market.

Expect to Change Routines

Whether your home includes a partner, children, or other family members, moving in another person can change things. Next Avenue highlights what to consider—such as whether you’ll have help from your siblings or whether you already have a healthy relationship with your loved one.

Inviting a senior family member to move with you involves lifestyle changes for both of you. But it can also provide opportunities for connection that you may not have considered before.

The decision to move an older adult loved one into your home may not be an easy one. But being there for your family member can help them live a fuller and healthier life. Especially if they were unsafe living at home alone, this move could be necessary. Ultimately, the challenge lies with navigating their relocation and settling into their new place with you.

Photo via Pixabay

 

One Stray Bullet Changed Todd Shelton’s Life Forever

Coach Todd Shelton put time and heart into reaching out to others in his community. After graduating from Missouri Western University, the football star came back to his hometown to get involved with football, track, and wrestling at McCluer South Berkeley High School. Todd was not just a coach; he was a role model. Todd worked hard to help these students navigate from high school to college. He touched, and continues to touch, so many lives.February 16, 2019, a random act of violence changed Todd’s life when he was shot during a drive-by shooting. This senseless act has not changed Todd’s mission in life; to make people’s lives better.

Watch this inspiring story to hear Todd’s story and to see how the KMOV Surprise SquadScott Credit Union and United Access teamed up to give Todd and his family a half time show of surprises.

Mobility Means Everything to the Callaway Family

Black Electric Lift Specialized Vehicle

Taking your child to doctor appointments shouldn’t be a challenge, but for families with children with disabilities, it can be that and much more; it can actually be life-threatening. Thankfully, there are organizations like Chive Charities who assist families when trying to purchase a wheelchair accessible vehicle.

Today is a special day. The Callaway family will be driving home in their new, safe, and reliable wheelchair accessible transportation from United Access (1389 N Cedarbrook Ave, Springfield, MO 65802). The Callaway Family will be leaving in their new 2019 Dodge Grand Caravan with CompanionVan side entry, making everyone’s life a little easier. Thanks to Chive Charities and their generous donors for helping to make this happen.

About the Callaway Family

“We were given a grim diagnosis from the start,” said Mrs. Callaway. “We were told he would never make it to birth and if he did, to cherish the short time we would have with him. The hospital had us fill out a death and funeral care plan before we were to deliver him.”

Raylan is truly a miracle. Raylan was diagnosed with Alobar Holoprosencephaly (HPE) at 20 weeks gestation. HPE is a rare brain malformation affecting 1 in 5,000 to 10,000 live births. Current studies indicate that only three percent of all fetuses diagnosed with HPE survive birth, and only one percent survive longer than 6-months. Raylan is beating the odds as he is now 7 years old!

Raylan was born by C-section due to his head being so large. He had hydrocephalus, also known as water on the brain.  He was 11lbs 11oz and most all that was in his head. The day after he was born, the family asked the doctor if there was anything that could be done to help Raylan be more comfortable. The doctor wasn’t optimistic and told Raylan’s parents that he couldn’t feel anything and to just let nature take its course. Thankfully that is not where his story ended. “We had an amazing nurse who stayed in the room with us after that doctor left,” said Mrs. Callaway.

She asked us what we wanted for Raylan. We told her that he was fighting to live and we were going to fight for him.

This nurse went above and beyond to help this family. She called in an amazing neurosurgeon, even though he was on vacation, he came to meet Raylan straight from the airport. “This new doctor came in the room, picked up our son, and gave us the most optimistic news we had heard since hearing of his diagnosis.” After an examination, this new doctor believed that Raylan could live as long as 18 to 24 months but that would require putting in a VP shunt in Raylan to drain the extra fluid from his head. The surgery went well and the Callaways were able to bring their son home. Not long after being home, they noticed that Raylan was extremely irritable and were struggling to feed him. The shunt was infected and this required another surgery and six weeks in the hospital. The first two years of Raylan’s life were tumultuous and even the neurosurgeon who gave the family their most optimistic life expectancy is amazed on how well he is doing.

Raylan has Cerebral Palsy with spasticitydiabetes insipidus, ventricular shunt for hydrocephalus, and feeding tube all due to having HPE. He is nonverbal but communicates with his facial expressions.  He has no head, neck, or trunk control and relies on his family for total care. Raylan is in a wheelchair. Through the last couple of years, he has had to have hip surgery due to his spasticity pulling his legs out of his hip joints. “Raylan’s spasticity is one of our biggest struggles,” said Mrs. Callaway. “Raylan gets over stimulated easily causing his muscles to get tight. When this happens his whole body gets red and splotchy. He begins shaking all over, screaming, he gets sweaty and his blood pressure spikes.” This condition is called storming.

Despite all this Raylan is a happy guy with a contagious smile. He loves his sisters and he loves being the center of attention.

Raylan has three amazing sisters – Mackenzie is 18, Miya is 14, and Madi is 11. They are great with their little brother and include him in everything they do. Mr. Callaway works as a Sheriff Deputy for Webster County while also owning and operating a small excavating business, Callaway Excavating. Mrs. Callaway stays home to care for Raylan. Going from therapy appointments to doctor appointments and overall daily care, it’s a full-time job.

Receiving an accessible vehicle is such a blessing for our family,” said Mrs. Callaway. “I currently drive a Suburban, but it is almost impossible for me to go anywhere alone with Raylan. Raylan’s wheelchair weighs 72 pounds. It is a struggle to lift it in and out of the back of the Suburban by myself. Raylan is also getting bigger. I have to transfer him to his car seat, which he is also starting to outgrow. It has gotten to where I would rather stay home than get him out.  A handicap accessible vehicle means he could stay in his wheelchair and we wouldn’t have to lift it, and him, in and out of the back of the Suburban.” This grant would make our life so much easier to go places and make the going more enjoyable.

For more information about Chive Charities, visit chivecharities.org. For more information about United Access, visit www.unitedaccess.com.